The Homesteader vs. Shoppers

Why Advertise in The Homesteader versus a Shopper?

Business owners often ask why should they pay more to advertise in a publication that has articles rather than a less-expensive “shopper” type product with little or no editorial. This is a great question and it is certainly a legitimate one.

Both publications are mailed and both have advertising, but The Shopper can be less expensive because there is little or no editorial cost. All of the space can be sold as advertising, whereas publications like The Homesteader have about 50% of the space used as articles. Why should advertisers pay extra for that editorial space?

First, let’s define what we mean by a “Shopper.” A shopper is typically a weekly newsprint publication that is direct-mailed to residents in a town or small group of towns. It has little or no “hard news” and consists mostly of advertising. You do not have to subscribe and it is mailed to the “resident.”

There is value in advertising in a shopper, especially if you are an established business that has a history of advertising in the shopper. That is because your current and former customers probably know your ad is there and the shopper is a convenient source of information about your company, any sales you might be having, etc. If someone knows about you, they might look for your ad in the shopper.

Shoppers work much like the yellow pages, without the product categories. They are not “read” so people rarely go through them on a regular basis. Rather, they are used as a resource when someone is looking to buy something, much like the other resources available (yellow pages, local newspaper, other publications, the Internet, etc.)

Publications that have “editorial” serve a different purpose. Sure, they can be used just as the shopper is used (someone is looking to buy something and they check all the sources of information easily available to them.) But these publications can also create awareness of your business, product, or service before the customer needs it. Editorial publications serve to introduce your business to the consumer.

This is because many people who get an editorial publication read it. They are looking for articles of interest and will read these articles every issue. They may have no interest in the advertising….but they see the ads anyway! They cannot help looking at the ads. The advertiser is getting exposure to the reader before they are even interested in whatever products or services are offered.

Maybe the ad will spark interest. Or maybe it will just plant the seed for future reference. In both cases the advertiser is creating awareness and good-will that can pay future dividends.

People like to shop businesses that they know. They like to have a connection. There are many motivating factors that will drive a new customer to you, but familiarity is certainly one of the most important. (Referrals are another.)

So publications that develop readership serve to make that important connection prior to the good or service being needed, so that when the need arises, there is already some awareness of the business.

In The Homesteader’s case, few of our readers are familiar with any local business when they first move in. Creating that “awareness” is a critical step in developing a relationship with these newcomers. Many new homeowners do not know anyone to ask for a referral, nor have they established those shopping loyalties which are so important to develop repeat business.

The articles we publish are designed with the new homeowner in mind, and we reach 100% of the market since the publication is free and direct-mailed to people who have purchased homes in the area.

We also have a “Fake Ad” contest which gives extra exposure to our advertisers because some of our readers are reading all the ads to find the one that is not real.

So if you are looking to create awareness and direct-response, consider

Why Advertise in The Homesteader versus a Shopper?

Business owners often ask why should they pay more to advertise in a publication that has articles rather than a less-expensive “shopper” type product with little or no editorial. This is a great question and it is certainly a legitimate one.

Both publications are mailed and both have advertising, but The Shopper can be less expensive because there is little or no editorial cost. All of the space can be sold as advertising, whereas publications like The Homesteader have about 50% of the space used as articles. Why should advertisers pay extra for that editorial space?

First, let’s define what we mean by a “Shopper.” A shopper is typically a weekly newsprint publication that is direct-mailed to residents in a town or small group of towns. It has little or no “hard news” and consists mostly of advertising. You do not have to subscribe and it is mailed to the “resident.”

There is value in advertising in a shopper, especially if you are an established business that has a history of advertising in the shopper. That is because your current and former customers probably know your ad is there and the shopper is a convenient source of information about your company, any sales you might be having, etc. If someone knows about you, they might look for your ad in the shopper.

Shoppers work much like the yellow pages, without the product categories. They are not “read” so people rarely go through them on a regular basis. Rather, they are used as a resource when someone is looking to buy something, much like the other resources available (yellow pages, local newspaper, other publications, the Internet, etc.)

Publications that have “editorial” serve a different purpose. Sure, they can be used just as the shopper is used (someone is looking to buy something and they check all the sources of information easily available to them.) But these publications can also create awareness of your business, product, or service before the customer needs it. Editorial publications serve to introduce your business to the consumer.

This is because many people who get an editorial publication read it. They are looking for articles of interest and will read these articles every issue. They may have no interest in the advertising….but they see the ads anyway! They cannot help looking at the ads. The advertiser is getting exposure to the reader before they are even interested in whatever products or services are offered.

Maybe the ad will spark interest. Or maybe it will just plant the seed for future reference. In both cases the advertiser is creating awareness and good-will that can pay future dividends.

People like to shop businesses that they know. They like to have a connection. There are many motivating factors that will drive a new customer to you, but familiarity is certainly one of the most important. (Referrals are another.)

So publications that develop readership serve to make that important connection prior to the good or service being needed, so that when the need arises, there is already some awareness of the business.

In The Homesteader’s case, few of our readers are familiar with any local business when they first move in. Creating that “awareness” is a critical step in developing a relationship with these newcomers. Many new homeowners do not know anyone to ask for a referral, nor have they established those shopping loyalties which are so important to develop repeat business.

The articles we publish are designed with the new homeowner in mind, and we reach 100% of the market since the publication is free and direct-mailed to people who have purchased homes in the area.

We also have a “Fake Ad” contest which gives extra exposure to our advertisers because some of our readers are reading all the ads to find the one that is not real.

So if you are looking to create awareness and direct-response, consider The Homesteader. We are a perfect complement to your other marketing efforts because we offer the long-term benefit of potential brand-new clients who have no established loyalties, are looking for local goods and services, and are not familiar with any local service-providers. We can deliver a great local audience of shoppers today and, most importantly, shoppers tomorrow. Introduce your business to all local new homeowners for just a few cents per household with The Homesteader.

For advertising information, locally or regionally, call The Homesteader at
(800) 941-9907.